Plagiarism Pattern: Placeless Paraphrase

Definition

A placeless paraphrase is paraphrasing plagiarism because it includes a summary of original source material and the citation, but it lacks the reference.

Original Source Material:

Five first principles are elaborated: (a) Learning is promoted when learners are engaged in solving real-world problems. (b) Learning is promoted when existing knowledge is activated as a foundation for new knowledge. (c) Learning is promoted when new knowledge is demonstrated to the learner. (d) Learning is promoted when new knowledge is applied by the learner. (e) Learning is promoted when new knowledge is integrated into the learner’s world.

Reference

Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 50(3), 43-59.

Student Version:

Merrill (2002) claims that learning is promoted when first principles of instruction are implemented. Students should solve authentic problems, arranged from simple to complex.


For a Certification Test item that is similar to this pattern, the correct answer is:

  Word-for-word plagiarism
  •  
  • Paraphrasing plagiarism
      Not plagiarism
    Explanation: Correct Version: Not plagiarized

    The student version is paraphrasing plagiarism because the reference is missing, although the in-text citation with the author and date is included.

     

    Merrill (2002) claims that learning is promoted when first principles of instruction are implemented. Students should solve authentic problems, arranged from simple to complex.

    Reference

    Merrill, M. D. (2002). First principles of instruction. Educational Technology Research and Development, 50(3), 43-59.

     

    See full list of plagiarism patterns.